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Cleanfax Insider / Business Planning / Pricing, Bidding & Estimating / Customer Satisfaction / Marketing & Advertising

Most sales pitches are horrible - Part 1

November 28, 2012
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I hate to spread bad news, but most cleaning sales pitches are horrible. Sad to say, this may include the pitches you have been reciting to your own clients.

Many sales pitches are repeated so often they sound like gibberish to your customers. The customer quickly tunes you out and it quickly becomes obvious they just want you to begin cleaning, which is why they called you in the first place.

They simply don’t want to hear your sales lingo. You can sound like a parrot if you keep reciting what many call “structured steps” to closing a sale. Not surprisingly, most savvy consumers easily see this.

This is probably one of the main reasons many sales pitches don’t work.

Why do I say this? Let’s be frank, the purpose of all sales pitch is to separate the client from their hard earned money, right? The reason you try to upsell additional services is to make an income, right? Sadly, this is the wrong motivation when it is the sole purpose of why you clean.

If this describes you, pay close attention. Your sales pitches may be one of the main reasons why you are not getting more additional sales.

Customer attitudes

One thing is certain, the client will often resist saying “yes” to anyone trying to sell them unwanted and unneeded services.

When a technician or an owner operator uses a sales pitch that is centered on “What can I get from you?” it will no doubt ricochet as a self-center request. Sales pitches rarely concentrate on “How can I be of service to you?”

These objectives are polar opposites of each other. “How can I be of service?” means you are servicing a client with the sole objective of making a client happy.

On the other hand, sales pitches mean one thing to a customer. They think all you care about is your commission.

All this being said, you are in business to make money and you must honestly provide information the customer needs on additional products beyond cleaning, such as deodorizers and protectors. How to communicate this and make the sale and to do it effectively as a consultant — and not as a salesperson — will be considered in part two next week.

Michael Morrow is a weekend consultant for Goldmarc, speaker and an IICRC approved instructor. He is the author of the book If You Don't Believe It, You Can't Upsell It. Morrow lives in Scottsdale AZ with his wife Leslie. He can be reached at (480) 388-4742 or MichaelDMorrow1@Gmail.com.

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